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People with pals at work more satisfied, productive – Kerry Hannon


“Friendships are among the most Fundamental of human needs,” writes Tom Raith in his new book on that topic, Vital Friends: The people You Can’t Afford to Live Without.

Still, to a surprising degree, many people fail to cultivate friends. That’s a big problem and not just for individuals. Rath, who heads the Gallup Organizations worldwide Workplace Research and Leadership Consulting practice, says it hurts companies too…


A Longitudinal Examination of Net Promoter and Firm Revenue Growth – Keiningham et al.


Managers have widely embraced and adopted the Net Promoter metric, which noted loyalty consultant Frederick Reichheld advocates as the single most reliable indicator of firm growth compared with other loyalty metrics, such as customer satisfaction and retention. Recently, however, there has been considerable debate about whether this metric is truly superior. This article (1) employs longitudinal data from 21 firms and 15,500-plus interviews from the Norwegian Customer Satisfaction Barometer to replicate the analyses used in Net Promoter research and (2) compares Reichheld and colleagues’ findings with the American Customer Satisfaction Index. Using industries Reichheld cites as exemplars of Net Promoter, the research fails to replicate his assertions regarding the “clear superiority” of Net Promoter compared with other measures in those industries…


Does Human Capital Matter? A Meta‐Analysis of the Relationship Between Human Capital and Firm Performance


Theory at both the micro and macro level predicts that investments in superior human capital generate better firm-level performance. However, human capital takes time and money to develop or acquire, which potentially offsets its positive benefits. Indeed, extant tests appear equivocal regarding its impact.  To clarify what is known, we meta-analyzed effects drawn from 66 studies of the human capital–firm performance relationship and investigated 3 moderators suggested by resource-based theory. We found that human capital relates strongly to performance, especially when the human capital in question is not readily tradable in labor markets and when researchers use operational performance measures that are not subject to profit appropriation. Our results suggest that managers should invest in programs that increase and retain firm-specific human capital…


Dear Management: Give Me Meaning, Not Money – Dan Pink


Offering external rewards, whether it’s bigger bonuses or more vacation time, is not the way to motivate employees in the 21st century, says Daniel H. Pink, Author of: Drive The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us. The old carrot-and-stick approach may have worked in the past, but getting people motivated now requires internal rewards such as autonomy and a sense of purpose…


Why Focusing on Employee Satisfaction is Dangerous


There is extensive evidence that happy and satisfied employees are more productive, create better experiences, and help support higher levels of employee engagement throughout the organization. As a result, there has been a rush to create initiatives that increase and measure employee
satisfaction. So what’s wrong with that?  Plenty.

Stated most directly, employee satisfaction should be framed by leadership…


The Emerging Field of Enterprise Engagement: Implications for Training – Bruce Bolger


Engagement has the potential to drive considerable demand for training at multiple  levels, starting at the top.

The term, “engagement,” has become increasingly popular in human resources and marketing circles. Dozens of professional conferences produced by organizations as diverse as Marcus Evans, Human Capital Institute, and The Conference Board have focused on the topic over the last few years, and engagement will be the subject of several sessions at the upcoming Society of Human Resource Management conference in Las Vegas. The term is being used in reference to employees, customers, training, communications, and, most recently, in social networking circles. The emergence of engagement presents both opportunities and challenges for the training executive and human resources profession overall…


Social Intelligence and the Biology of Leadership ‐ Goleman and Boyatzis


New studies of the brain show that leaders can improve group performance by understanding the biology of empathy.

The concept of emotional intelligence continues to occupy a prominent space in the leadership literature and in everyday coaching practices. But in the past five years, research in the emerging field of social neuroscience—the study of what happens in the brain while people interact—is beginning to reveal subtle new truths about what makes a good leader…


Rookie managers often left to sink or swim – Wallace Immen


Bill Mitchell still remembers the sheer panic he felt when he moved into his first managerial  role.  “The transition from having to account only for yourself to being in a position in which you have to hold others accountable is one of the most stressful in life,” said Mr. Mitchell, now senior account executive for Western Canada for talent management consulting firm Development Dimensions International Inc.  Instead of getting support from the organization, “I was thrown in and had to sink or swim. I got  frustrated and started to question my own competence and confidence…


Getting Started: Best Practices in Connection Cultures – E Pluribus Partners


During my presentation I laid the foundation for connection. Now that you are back in your offices, here are a few reminders about best practices that increase connection. By staying connected with your colleagues, you will experience the productivity, prosperity and joy that come from keeping your team united and growing together…


You’re Valuable to Us – It’s Not Just Lip Service – Globe & Mail


Managers be warned: In these tough economic times, a growing number of unhappy employees who’d otherwise play hooky will drag themselves into work for fear of losing their jobs – but they won’t be much good to you because they’re so unmotivated, a study suggests. One way you can get them to show up, perk up and be more productive: Get them to think about what they really love about their work, another study finds…


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